Benchmarking Partnerships

 

MEMORY JOGGER NOTES – Australian BEST PRACTICE AWARDS 2012

1st Place Winner - CURTIN UNIVERSITY – INTERPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION IN HEALTH – Director, Margo Brewer.

APPROACH

  • About effective collaboration and improving health outcomes – not multiprofessional
  • The main drivers are knowledge/ collaborative practice and how to work together
  • Interprofessional approach is about learning from, with and about each other.
  • Linked to WHO and other international directions and WA health strategy
  • The international evidence is very positive
  • Client centred framework used for assessment of students
  • Focus on clients

DEPLOYMENT

  • Now in the 4th year of the ADRI cycle
  • Case studies of health issues across disciplines in undergraduate years 1 to 4 plus some post graduate courses
  • Related to measurable strategic statement
  • Used stakeholder framework including students and staff
  • Doctors are becoming engaged
  • Examples include a team of interprofessional students learning on the job by running the morning shift of a ward in a local hospital

INNOVATION

  • We send students to remote and needy countries and communities as a collaborative team.
  • Can teach people to coordinate care across disciplines eg care for a son with disabilities
  • Common units in first year gives opportunity for students to develop a broad and interprofessional perspective of health
  • Case based workshops – for students to develop integrated care plan – students see “cases” as real people
  • Patient viewed as a member of care team
  • Changing traditional approach to course design – interprofessional team of staff developed

PERFORMANCE

  • Student leadership capabilities improved, understand their roles and learning how to work together
  • International evidence strong
  • See Sustainability below
  • Surveys, questionnaires, audits, assessment tool, student review group
  • Positive outcomes / understanding reports from students – they do understand what it means
  • Workshop outcomes eg motivation, knowledge and confidence improved
  • Patient ratings all 90-98% on various attributes – patients wanting to be in student ward rather than ordinary ward.
  • Student attitudes improving but link to patient outcomes yet to be established in this program although overseas research points to link.
  • Our website is the 3rd highest visited website in ‘Health Sciences’

EVIDENCE

  • International visits and acknowledgement of how mature our practice is internationally from learning about what they have done with what we have done- Benchmarking.
  • Integrated ward operations in Perth hospital
  • Seen as leaders now in best practice eg contact from other organisations interested
  • Conference papers / presentations and journal and other publications
  • Funding from government
  • Won 3 teaching excellence awards
  • Letter from president of Centre for Advancement of Interprofessional Education – innovation and outstanding voted papers to conference
  • Feedback from workshops

IMPROVEMENT

  • Strategic industry partner working party

SUSTAINABILITY

  • Started 2009 – still going and growing – industry partners, universities collaborated with, students in classroom and practice increasing dramatically
  • Success stories
  • Doctors showing more respect
  • Students think they are doing the obvious – why would you train people any other way

BENCHMARKING

  • Consulted with other organisations internationally
  • Local health care challenge leading to international competition

2nd Place Winner- UNIVERSITY OF WOLLONGONG – PASS (Peer Assisted Study Sessions) – Director, Sally Rogan

APPROACH

  • Ranked in the top 3 Universities in ‘Student and learning’
  • This Practice is an 11 year journey with significant uptake/engagement/ results and growth- see below
  • Not a remedial program – voluntarily available to all students
  • Started with core subjects with high failure rates
  • Know as ‘Supergroup’ learning facilitated by senior students
  • Students from school have trouble with self directed learning at Uni
  • Supports 3 of 6 UOW strategic goals
  • Senior Students goal is training and independent learning without giving PASS students the answers
  • PASS is aimed at reducing failure and improving retention rates
  • Research has found that students typically upon starting at Uni need to make friends within 5 weeks, so PASS help connect people in friendship whilst transferring skills and social support.

DEPLOYMENT

  • Typically around 15 students in a PASS group led by a senior student
  • Managed centrally helps focus deployment
  • First and second year subjects where students are transitioning in from international or TAFE and some post graduate as well
  • Looks at underpinning concepts around a task but not directly at the task
  • Strong leadership involvement from faculties.

INNOVATION

  • Not a remedial program – available to all students
  • Mentoring – not giving answers – we don’t want you to do what you’ve seen in your own education – need to culture independent learning skills by students
  • Seamless integration of academic and social support
  • No central funding to start with – relying on faculty funding
  • Despite central funding now still retained faculty funding buy-in financially – 50:50 model
  • Needed rigorous reporting and performance evaluation to ensure ongoing faculty (self) funding

PERFORMANCE

  • Students feedback that it helps them make friends / social contact
  • 50% growth in program size from 2010 to 2012
  • Growth in participation / contact hours up by 21% - 5,780 participants so far in 2012
  • Student feedback good – attendees 11 marks higher on average, non-attendees 5 times as likely to fail
  • 94% found it an enjoyable learning experience
  • UOW in top 3 of student retention stats (retention linked to PASS participation) – possible $20million in retention revenue
  • PASS leaders snapped up by industry
  • Saves students time, dynamic nature of group learning and collaboration and development of independent elearning skills – student feedback
  • Scientific evidence points to it’s the weaker students who volunteer to attend PASS

EVIDENCE

  • Other Unis are implementing PASS
  • Most awarded PEER learning program in world – only institute outside USA to win particular award
  • UOW National Centre for PASS by invitation
  • See Benchmarking below

IMPROVEMENT

  • Balancing of developing and quality retention

SUSTAINABILITY

  • 11 year journey
  • Now a national program
  • Now central funding
  • Recommendations from past participants eg family members

BENCHMARKING

  • Started from study trip to USA
  • UOW National Centre for PASS by invitation
  • Developing national best practice guidelines for Benchmarking – now being picked up internationally
  • 30/30 stars for education experience – VC singled out PASS as contributing to this result

3rd Place Winner - SUMMITCARE – RE-ENGINEERING OF CUSTOMER FEEDBACK MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS. Designed and written by Dr Lee Chin

APPROACH

  • Residential aged care provider
  • Effective partnership between Consultant and Leadership Team
  • Staff absorbed the work for this project into their existing workloads
  • Started in 2010, implemented 1 year now
  • End to end system
  • Customer focus – residents’ average stay is 6-12 months
  • Clients are vulnerable, they don’t have choices to go somewhere else quickly
  • Focused on managing feedback better from primary (residents) and secondary (families) customers
  • Guided by ABEF and all staff have role to play
  • Aligned to Vision and Strategic Goals
  • Consultative process with customers and staff
  • Provides input on what is Quality for individual clients (enormous variation in needs)
  • The approach is to make it easy and safe to raise concerns

DEPLOYMENT

  • ISO & CSIA alignment
  • Leadership team engaged from the start
  • Manager’s prime role
  • All staff a role to play- positive response to feedback
  • Standardised use of forms and process
  • Logical flow of steps in process – cues staff to take appropriate actions
  • Staff training at various points in their careers
  • Training and presentation manual for consistency of information and approach
  • Deployed across all 9 centres – 19 initial training sessions at implementation.  32 follow up communication training workshops for frontline staff. Presented at different times and on different days to different shifts
  • Workshops to build communication skills of staff.
  • Information sessions for families and friends presented at every Centre
  • Change management strategies identified and implemented – Communication; Practice Implementation; Evaluation
  • Understanding the ‘unspoken cues’ that are important, seeking to understand through listening, tone of voice and show that we really care – especially important when many staff and customers have English as second language.

INNOVATION

  • Integral to business – part of day-to-day-work
  • Feedback Management System is internally integrated in the organisation
  • Complete system – policies and procedures; new forms; comprehensive electronic log on shared drive; education sheets for staff; cheat sheets; risk assessment matrix; template letters; Training and Presentation Manual.
  • Positive approach - changed from complaints management system to feedback management system
  • Exceeds govt requirements – anticipated outcomes of review of ACCS
  • Brainstorming and critical reflection to harness innovative ideas from staff
  • Includes compliments and suggestions as well as complaints
  • Fairness, accessibility etc principles used
  • Feedback management is core business and helps us to ensure we meet needs of our residents
  • Customers are asked to say what changes they want to see
  • Increased communication with complainant to involve them during resolution process
  • Use of “cheat sheets” for staff to make it easy and consistent
  • Reports to clients / staff to inform them of what changes have occurred as a result of the feedback.
  • Quick fix form – for issues that are sorted out on the spot by staff – captures what they did so systemic problems identified, recorded and appropriate action taken and the learning shared
  • Looking for root causes so that recurrences are avoided
  • Used in marketing package
  • Staff anticipate complaints before they happen and act to prevent them
  • Education strategy – orientation, in-service training, train the trainer, follow up communication workshops
  • Customer Service Charter developed and displayed
  • Balance of lead and lag measures – actively seeking feedback, staff training, customer satisfaction – capacity to better anticipate customer requirements

PERFORMANCE

  • Process trackable in time – where the complaint is at and or resolved
  • Less complaints – its becoming normal practice
  • Demonstrated positive change in staff attitudes
  • Feedback on types of complaints from their centre with staff
  • Reduced number of complaints that are externally escalated to ACCS
  • Not aimed at necessarily reducing number of complaints (want customers to give feedback), but rather reduce escalation and increase satisfaction
  • External benchmarker regularly interviews families about satisfaction – extensive analysis and reporting
  • 62% reduction in no. of complaints escalated to Aged Care Complaints Scheme
  • Increase in quick fix records
  • Sustained improvement in Occupancy levels - increased from 93% to 96.4%
  • Communication measures
  • Industry recognition – Notable Mention Award in 2012 Process Excellence Awards
  • Eligible for CSIA certification

EVIDENCE

  • One other aged care provider has used this system tailored to their needs
  • Aged Care Association Australia (NSW) – says this is innovative and ticked the boxes (exceeded requirements) of Aged Care Complaints Scheme (ACCS)
  • Positive response from ACCS, NSW
  • Anticipated the ACCS requirements before they were released to industry
  • Modeling our attitude to staff and this has been reflected in a desire to seek/serve better.

IMPROVEMENT

  • Ongoing communication strategy – with stakeholders, education for staff, information sessions for families
  • Continue to collect staff feedback on system
  • Looking at role of champions
  • Continuous improvement from staff feedback eg of forms, reviewing and improving processes
  • Next - More electronic as IT system matures
  • More consultations earlier
  • Analysis to be done of complaint resolution process

SUSTAINABILITY

  • Internal integration – ensuring actions are taken at all levels to avoid recurrence
  • Embedded in processes of organisation
  • Ongoing Change Management strategies – Communication; Practice Implementation; Education
  • Supporting processes were identified and defined:
    - Documentation to support staff processes and information sheets provide guidance to ensure steps are understood and followed.
    - Consistent approach from staff; template letters;
  • Continued engagement with customers and stakeholders
  • Ongoing review and evaluation

BENCHMARKING

  • Literature review – Australia and International – aged care and other service industries
  • Investigated systems used by other aged care providers
  • Looked at current internal practice internal -  use of forms, reports and processes– identified good and poor practice
  • Not externally benchmarked in aged care industry
  • Customer satisfaction
  • External benchmarking company regularly surveys families regarding satisfaction, complaints. In depth analysis and reports.
  • Staff satisfaction and attitudes
  • Feedback and comments from regular Resident and Relative meetings
  • Every complaint is situational – difficult to set hard benchmarks –  look at customer satisfaction; internal processes; staff awareness

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